Roman fruit and vegetable market + the end

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Okay, guys, this is the last of our Europe 2012 trip. It sure was fantastic! What better way to spend a week in Rome than to do it celebrating Grandma and Grandpa L’s 50th wedding anniversary! Congratulations, you two!

[Please note: the following accounts are a bit out of chronological order. Deal with it.]

During our last two days in Rome I did some serious clothes shopping. July and February are huge sale months in Rome, apparently. Happily for me, the main street just a block and a piazza away from our apartment overflowed with name-brand shops, most of with which I was unfamiliar, all with “SALDI! SALDI!” plastered across their display windows full of bright summer clothing. Even Gap, the only name I recognized, offered massive sales; they had a racks of clothing for €4 – I’ve never seen prices that low in Gap in the US! Even better than the prices was the clothing itself! While American stores seem to sell clothing tailored to fit inanimate mannequins or shapeless super models, the stores in Rome abounded with clothing that fit! And was comfortable! It was a glorious miracle!

Grandma and Grandpa, Mom and Dad, Aunt Marylu, and I also visited Campo di Fiori, a fresh food market within walking or busing distance from our apartment. Fruit and vegetable markets are one of my favorite parts of international travel. Even though farmers’ markets are slowly popping up here and there at home, nothing beats the well-established tradition of a foreign food market for gorgeous produce flawlessly displayed in beautiful mounds of every imaginable color. I can wander them contentedly  for hours.

Our final museum of the trip wasn’t really a museum at all, at least not in the way that the other ones were with their troves of ancient art treasures. This one displayed some of the hundreds of inventions of Leonardo Da Vinci in working form. Visitors were allowed to touch and manipulate many pieces, most of which were mechanisms for changing one type of motion, say vertical, to another type of motion, perhaps horizontal. Also included were some diving and scuba diving suits. These were all items he never actually made, mind you, so nothing I touched had ever been formed by the hands of Da Vinci himself. Besides the kinesthetic pieces, the museum included a fascinating video display explaining the meaning behind Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man – how its proportions related to the golden ratio and so on. Unlike the short film about Da Vinci’s life, the display was soundless with English subtitles. I didn’t bother with the film’s all-Italian-and-cheesy-acting-and-no-subtitles approach.

The morning of our departure – the morning after a delightful last supper of crispy, thin-crust Italian pizza – our family and the grandparents actually did not have to wake up excessively early, especially compared to everyone else who rose at 3:30am for their 7am flights. Still, at Dad’s insistence we arrived at the airport three hours before our 11:45 flight, and as much as I dislike saying it, particularly when it comes to airport timing, it’s a good thing we did. Dad was right. The line just to enter the ticketing area took forever. Check-in wasn’t too bad, but security was very long. By the time we snagged a speedy breakfast and found our gate, our flight had begun boarding. Perfect timing! And we were only 45 minutes delayed leaving. Excellent end to an excellent trip.

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One comment

  1. Thanks for sharing the trip to its end. So glad you enjoyed it so much. It will be a good memory until you can make another some day. Grandma M.

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