better than Pompeii: Ostia Antica

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I told you earlier:

Herculaneum > Pompeii

Well, you should know something else:

Ostia Antica > Pompeii

The ruins of the pre-Roman port of Ostia Antica are a very reachable 30-minute metro and train trip outside of Rome towards the Mediterranean. Once at the train station, it’s just a brief 10 or so minute walk to the gate at the edge of the ruins. Pay your entry fee and amble on in; there are no crowds to shuffle behind or lines to wait in.

Though I am not sure of its actual size, Ostia Antica felt as large as the ruins of Pompeii, if not larger. Regardless, it is quite evident that the entirety of the ruins have not yet been fully excavated, judging from the walls poking up from the forest floor beyond the already exhumed buildings. Starting at the ruins of graves and mausoleums outside of the town proper, the buildings only grown in size and level of preservation. The impressiveness of the preservation of the structures of Ostia Antica is what makes it better than Pompeii. Just as in Herculaneum, it is easy to imagine Ostia Antica as a throbbing, active port town. No need for verbal or pictorial reconstructions of most buildings; just look at them to know what function they served.

Ostia Antica’s only drawback in comparison to Pompeii is its lack of decorative flair. Its mosaics, incredibly expansive, beautiful, and accurate though they may be, are in black and white as opposed to brilliant color in Pompeii. Its buildings do not display as much marble, ornamental or otherwise, as Pompeii’s toppled temples and tumbled villas. Perhaps it’s just my impression, but I suspect Ostia Antica was not as wealthy as Pompeii. Plus, it is older, so what carved stone and color tile used to exist may have disappeared more completely than in Pompeii, with its sudden burial.

However, aesthetic quibbles aside, Ostia Antica’s mosaics, underground tunnels, towering amphitheater, and endlessly interconnected houses are excellent fun, especially since very few areas are roped off. I explored every corner and turn of nearly every building with which I came in contact for the first two and a half hours I we were inside the ruins. Of course, I never finished seeing everything. To do that you would need a good five or six hours, I think. As it was, our 4 hours or so in the ruins felt sufficient. I enjoyed it.

Go to Ostia Antica, people.

 

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2 comments

  1. Your slideshow on this one was marvelous!! You have pictures of Ostia Antica I never saw! Love the other ones also especially the one of the typical Italian parking style. Love, Grandma L.

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